Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 20th Euro Congress on Psychiatrists and Psychologists Rome, Italy.

Day 1 :

Conference Series Euro Psychiatrists 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Javier Fiz Perez photo
Biography:

Professor Javier Fiz Perez teaches Developmental Psychology, Spam of life and Education apply to Clinic and Organizational field. Responsible for the development of international research and Senior Research of the Laboratory of Applied Psychology in the field of Organizational Psychology (Business and Health Lab) at the European University of Rome. He’s a Psychologist and Psychotherapist being in Italy a Member of the Advisory Board of the Academic Senate of l’Accademia Tiberina. Professor Fiz Perez is also the Scientific Research Director of the European Institute of Positive Psychology (IEPP. Madrid).

Abstract:

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine the prevalence rate of workplace bullying in a sample of Italian and Spanish employees, and its differential consequences on employees’ job satisfaction and psychological well-being. The effects of workplace bullying on job satisfaction and psychological well-being were explored taking into account a contextualized approach.

Design/Methodology/Approach: Cross-sectional study was adopted, in which a sample of 1,151 employees in Italy and 705 in Spain completed a questionnaire. We hypothesized that the relationship between exposure to bullying behaviors and psychological well-being is mediated by job satisfaction, and that this simple mediation model is moderated by the country (moderated mediation).

Findings: Results suggest that no particular differences exist in bullying prevalence among Spanish and Italian employees. However, we found scientific confirmation of our hypothesized moderated mediation model.

Research Limitations/Implications: Nevertheless the limitations of the sample studied, findings capture contextual differences in the bullying phenomenon, which may have several implications for further research in this domain, as well as for designing interventions to deal with workplace bullying.

Originality/Value: Although this study explores bullying in different cultural contexts without investigating specific cultural values, it establishes the roots to evaluate workplace bullying from a contextualized perspective. 

Keynote Forum

Andrea J Levinson

University of Toronto, Canada

Keynote: Interdisciplinary care delivery for transitional youth in the university campus setting

Time : 10:15-11:00

Conference Series Euro Psychiatrists 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Andrea J Levinson photo
Biography:

Andrea J Levinson is the Psychiatrist-in-Chief, Health & Wellness, at the University of Toronto. She is responsible for the provision and management of psychiatric services to U of T students, primarily from the St. George campus. She supervises all of the psychiatric activity, and acts as a resource for the university community on mental health issues across the campus. She is also a graduate of the Clinician Scientist Program and received a Master’s of Science degree for her research in that program. She has extensive youth psychiatry, having founded an early intervention clinic for young people with new onset bipolar disorders. Currently, she is the Clinical Lead in Bipolar Disorders at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH). 

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: In the university campus clinic where 14,000 students have been seen in the past year, family physicians provide the majority of longitudinal mental health care and support to students with psychiatric diagnoses. Historically, they have lacked prompt access to psychiatric consultation and have had to support students’ mental health needs alone, necessitating urgent care and emergency room visits. In the clinic situated on campus, psychiatric consultation was provided in a separate manner, where family physicians were not involved in the care plan for a student, and psychiatric care was not collaborative, shared or responsive. The University of Toronto (U of T) is the largest university in Canada, with 60,000 post-secondary students attending its central St. George campus.

Methodology: This study describes the development of a coordinated, collaborative model of service delivery where family physicians would have greater access to consultation and collaboration in the care of young transitional youth on the university campus. Interdisciplinary care is delivered in the family practice setting. Service utilization, the efficacy of the model and the perspectives of students and care providers are evaluated.

Findings: Collaborative care has facilitated more stream-lined and student-centered access to psychiatric care in a large campus health setting. The integrated medical and psychiatric needs of this young transitional youth cohort on campus are met through caseconferencing, indirect care and a “shared care” delivery of service model.

Conclusion & Significance: Collaborative care provides a pathway and model of care that creates scope for indirect psychiatric consultation, quicker access to psychiatric opinion and consultation, and interdisciplinary learning for different healthcare providers. 

Break: Networking and Refreshments Break 11:00-11:15 @ Foyer

Keynote Forum

Diana Kljenak

University of Toronto, Canada

Keynote: Harnessing power of transference and countertransference in CBT

Time : 11:15-12:00

Conference Series Euro Psychiatrists 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Diana Kljenak photo
Biography:

Diana Kljenak is an Assistant Professor and a Cognitive-Behavior Therapy (CBT) Lead for the University of Toronto, Department of Psychiatry. Her academic and clinical work has focused on psychotherapy, continuous professional and practice development (CPPD) and collaborative mental health care. She is a CBT Seminar Co-lead at University of Toronto, Department of Psychiatry and a Psychotherapy Coordinator at the UHN Centre for Mental Health. She was awarded a Full Tuition Scholarship for the 2013 Teaching and Supervising CBT Workshop for Graduate Faculty, Beck Institute for Cognitive Behavior Therapy and 2017 Psychotherapy Award for Academic Excellence at University of Toronto, Department of Psychiatry. Her CPPD activities include directing Bi-Annual UHN, Department of Psychiatry-Community Education Day, which is now in its 6th year as well as co-chairing inaugural CPPD Day. She is also the past President of the Ontario Psychiatric Association and a past Co-chair of the Ontario Coalition of Psychiatrists. 

Abstract:

Cognitive Behavior therapy (CBT) is an evidence-based therapy used to effectively treat a number of mental health disorders. Traditionally, CBT has been thought of as a treatment modality that is technique-based and not as concerned with the therapeutic relationship as other forms of psychotherapy. Basic CBT model will be reviewed. Participants will learn how transference and countertransference can be understood through a CBT lens. Case examples will be used to illustrate how cognitive and behavioral techniques could be effectively used to recognize and manage countertransference. Participants will be able to reflect on the use of these techniques in their own practice regardless of their preferred psychotherapeutic modality.

  • Workshop
Location: Olimpica 3+4
Speaker
Biography:

Einat kaufman is an Cognitive Psychotherapist, expert in trauma, grief and bereavement (Master in psychology, Psy candidates in psychology). She works in a private clinic as a therapist and a counselling to security forces at the government of Israel. Take part in several missions as first aid psychosocial all over the world after disasters.

 

Abstract:

 

The purpose of this workshop is to present a working model that helps the therapist to provide a fast and focused psychological first help to the citizen at the scene of disaster and emergency. In the recent years, I found myself working in an increasingly dangerous environment, taking quick decisions and detect necessary actions for the patient in the field, and often place myself in actual danger, or mentally and physically. My desire to work in the heat of disaster occurrence encourages me to try many tools that have helped me at the therapeutic level; some tools were adopted and some of them were built by the needs on the field. I based this model on my experience and my work in Israel - with security and civil institutions, Liberia - working with mental health and social workers after the Ebola crisis and civil war and Ecuador by working with citizens, therapists and security institutions after the earthquake. As a therapist specializing in grief and bereavement which operates mainly on the cognitive approach, I felt confident to reach the surface and take action. And then I realized that I should adapt the tools to the rapid rhythm and changing realities on the field. Therefore, I decided to build a formula of tools that will help the therapist in the field and maximize the opportunity (sometimes is unique) to assist people affected by the disaster. I found that a combination of several steps can make a difference for the patient to cope the new reality which includes: 1) Ventilation: exploring the traumatic event. 2) Information: get focused on the narrative and find a way to organize the information. 3) Organization: reorganization of the trauma and build a new i.e. re-conceptualize. 4) Self-care: search for an initial solution and creating a toolbox for coping and adaptation the new reality. In conclusion, emergencies and disasters happen suddenly. They invite the patient to readjust to the new unwanted and forced reality. On the other hand, they invite and challenge the therapist to address the problem targeted in a rapid way to help, adjust and normalize this new reality. In my view, this model may help bridge that gap.

  • Special Session
Location: Olimpica 3+4

Session Introduction

Yacov Rofe

Bar-Ilan University, Israel

Title: Psycho-Bizarreness: The intuitive rational-choice theory of madness

Time : 12:35-13:35

Speaker
Biography:

Yacov Rofe is a professor of psychology and former chair of the Interdisciplinary Department of Social Sciences at Bar-Ilan University in Ramat Gan, Israel. He taught for the Department of Psychology at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, and was a visiting professor at Rutgers Medical School in New Jersey.He has published many articles in leading academic journals of psychology, including a theory entitled “Stress and Affiliation: a Utility Theory”, published by Psychological Review in 1984. An additional influential article, published in Review of General Psychology, 2008, is a review that refutes the existence of repression and the Freudian Unconscious.

Abstract:

This book presents a new theory, Psycho-Bizarreness: The Intuitive Rational-Choice Theory of Madness, which explains the development and treatment of schizophrenia, criminal insanity and neuroses, as rational coping mechanisms. Psycho-Bizarreness Theory (PBT) claims that when individuals are confronted with extreme levels of stress, regardless of whether the source of the stress is environmental or neurological impairments that prevent them to satisfy their basic needs, their behavioral options become limited. While some individuals prefer to remain depressed, commit suicide, become drug abusers or use aggression to eliminate the stressor, a minority of people intuitively choose certain mad behaviors that serve their coping needs.
Madness, defined by five operational criteria (see Rofé, 2016), is seen primarily as a repressive coping mechanism, which enables patients to block the accessibility of stress-related thoughts. The choice of a specific behavior is determined by the same three principles which guide the consumer's decision-making process when purchasing a certain product (e.g., see Wänke &
Friese, 2005). This includes the need to exercise control over the stressor, availability of suitable "merchandise" and cost-benefit
analysis.
Although the decision to implement the intuitive/unconscious choice is conscious, patients become unaware of the Knowledge of Self-Involvement (KSI), or the True Reason (TR) for acting bizarrely, through a variety of cognitive processes that disrupt the encoding of this knowledge and memory-inhibiting mechanisms that cause its forgetfulness.Subsequently, utilizing their socially internalized beliefs regarding the causes of psychological disorders, patients develop a self-deceptive belief which attributes the cause of their symptoms to factors beyond their conscious control, and thus stabilizes the unawareness of KSI/
TR.

Break: Lunch Break 13:35-14:20 @ Restaurant
  • Psychology | Mental health and Psychiatric Complications | Neuropsychology and brain/ behavioural disorders | Dissociative and Addictive Disorders | Child and Adolescent Psychology
Location: Olimpica 3+4
Speaker

Chair

Erez Yaakobi

Ono Academic College, Israel

Speaker

Co-Chair

Einat Kaufman

Kaufman therapy, Israel

Speaker
Biography:

Paolo Scapellato graduated in Psychology at the University of Bologna in 1998 and then specialized in Cognitive-Behavioral Psychotherapy at the Skinner Institute in Rome. He is active in psychotherapy privately in Macerata, where he lives, and since 2006 is a Contract Professor of Clinical Psychology and Fundamentals of Clinical Investigation at the European University of Rome. He is Professor and Supervisor of the School of Specialization in Psychotherapy of the Skinner Institute in Rome and Naples.In Macerata, he is President of the Association of psychologists and pedagogues “Praxis” since 2002 and technical consultant for the Court. He is the author of numerous national and international publications and books  Attacchi di panico e ansia acuta, supporto psicologico di base” (Giunti ed., 2017), Fondamenti di Investigazione Clinica (Editori Riuniti, 2014) e Prevenzione e trattamento delle dipendenze (Editori Riuniti, 2014).

Abstract:

For many years now, all over the world, the life-saving Basic Life Support and Defibrillation (BLS-D) is considered the most common protocol of intervention, thanks to which deaths and damage caused by cardiac arrest have lowered remarkably. The success of this first aid technique, in terms of outcomes and dissemination is attributable to the simplicity of the intervention and to the fact that anybody, including untrained individuals, can learn it and use it. The principle that every human being can, essentially, save the life of another human being has been a real revolution, not only in the medical field, but also from a social point of view. However, the same revolution did not take place in the field of psychological well-being. According to the World Health Organization, mental pain is a worrying health emergency, showing impressive, steadily increasing figures (World Health Organization, 2001; 2013). The panic attack, specifically, is an increasingly frequent phenomenon in the population and, despite it isn’t considered as a real disease, it is often associated with many mental disorders, further aggravating the clinical picture.  Providing first aid to somebody who is experiencing a panic attack in its acute phase is a very strong and intense situation. It’s scary, and it makes somebody feel completely disarmed and helpless sometimes. Moreover, without a proper training, the help provided may be ineffective or even counterproductive. That’s why the BPS (Basic Psychological Support®) was designed, as an intervention protocol for rescuers based on scientific evidence and consisting in simple procedures and behaviors aimed at the early management of panic attack and of acute anxiety, waiting of specialist rescue operations. A protocol designed for everyone, easy to learn and easy to use that aims to provide to the citizens of some skills which are simple but with a very strong social impact, and that represent a real innovation in the field of international psychology.

Speaker
Biography:

Flavia Maria Margaritelli, she is a president of Association Health and Safety Observatory, teacher trainer, consultant Hr Safety & Health in the workplace for over 10 years, has her expertise in Evaluation work-related stress risk for companies and public administration, technical expert in managing anxiety, operating personal and social skills.

Abstract:

Background: In the crisis framework faced by many areas of Italy and Europe, the main resource available for revitalizing the socio-economic fabric is represented by human capital. Life skills, in the suffering contexts of the structural crisis, as many authors show, are the fundamental skills to implement for troubleshooting. In a systemic, interactionism and ecological perspective of the study of resilience, this paper describes the possibility of stimulating life and soft skills in a deep industrial crisis area, characterized by unemployment and population decline, in which the negative bias limits the population vision.

Objective: The Resilience Festival (years 2015 and 2016), an experiment developed by “ProPositivo (propositional)” association in Marghine, a West-Center region of Sardinia, has favored projects that are stimulating institutions and citizens in the research and formulation of new resilient solutions about the production, consumption and sociability side.

Methods: The Festival has allowed the emergence of life skills among the participants such as creativity-Innovation, team work, decision making, conflict management, change ability, stress tolerance, goal setting. There were observed, through a multidisciplinary methodological approach based on positive psychology, the economy of sharing, the direct participation of artistsand researchers, the use of experiential learning techniques (ethnographic tourism, workshops, coach surfing, emotional and physical theater), the skills in the collective creation of an itinerant artistic theatrical performance, attended by the population and meticulously documented in digital format.

Conclusions: The social experiment of the Resilience Festival is an ongoing process that starts with interesting results, and tends to lay the foundation, in 2017, for further applied research through qualitative and quantitative insights that can allow a careful evaluation of the experience.

Speaker
Biography:

Adsson Magalhaes is a Psychologist, and Behavior Analyst. He received Master’s in Neuroscience and Behavior and PhD from Institute of Psychology of University of São Paulo, Brazil. During 2016, he was an exchange student at Stockholm University, studying the Borg Scales with Prof. Elisabet Borg. For the last five years, he has been dedicated to study Psychophysics, Perception, Clinical Psychology, Behavior Analysis and Autism. 

Abstract:

The Borg CR scales® are Category-Ratio scales with verbal anchors placed in agreement with the numerical scale so as to obtain ratio data. The scales were first developed to assess physical exertion and have been widely applied in physiology, ergonomy, physiotherapy, etc. We aimed to study the use of the Borg CR100 Scale (centiMax®, cM) to assess depressive symptoms. In an online survey, 32 symptoms of depression were scaled in centiMax and compared to the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Here we analyzed the answers from 100 students of Psychology (50 Brazilians-BR and 50 Swedes-SE). The Swedish average BDI was 14.0 (“Mild depression”), compared to 26.1 cM (a moderately Strong perception or feeling), and the Brazilian was 13.3, on BDI and 20.4 cM. The SE-Pearson correlation between CR100 and BDI was 0.754 (p<0.001) and BR-correlation r=0.824 (p<0.001), which implies that the CR100 can be used to assess depression. More importantly, with ratio data the true relationships among feelings can be studied. In this sample of healthy participants, “Tiredness or Fatigue”, was given the highest rating (m = 43.9 cM-SE), for example perceived as about twice as strong as “Guilt” (m=21.8 cM-SE) and approximately four times as strong as “Punishment Feelings” (m=11.6 cM-SE). The results show that the Borg CR100 Scale is valid to assess depressive symptoms and also provides data with more possibilities of using the scores than the BDI, for example in symptom profiles for individuals (Fig. 1) or for groups. With Borg’s range model, both intra- and inter-symptom comparisons, within and between single individuals as well as groups, are possible.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Maya Libben is an Assistant Professor of Psychology and Director of the Psychopathology Lifespan and Neuropsychology (PLAN) Laboratory at the University of British Columbia Okanagan. Her research focuses on the use of cutting-edge methodological platforms to advance neuropsychological treatment and rehabilitation protocols. Most recently, she has focused on the use of eye-tracking techniques to advance our understanding of the attentional deficits underlining hemispatial neglect and develop new rehabilitation protocols. Her research has been supported by grants from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, the Canadian Foundation for Innovation and the Brain and Behaviour Research Foundation. In addition to her research, she is a practicing Clinical Psychologist, providing psychotherapeutic and neuropsychological assessment services to members of the community. 

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Hemispatial neglect is defined as a failure to report, respond, or orient to stimuli on the contralesional side of space. Despite affecting up to two-thirds of right-hemisphere stroke patients, neglect is a relatively poorly understood phenomenon. Of importance to rehabilitation and clinical outcome studies is the differentiation between viewer-centered or egocentric neglect, and stimulus-centered or allocentric neglect. The current study aimed to a) develop a novel method of assessing neglect subtypes using eye-tracking technology; b) investigate specific patterns of attention associated with each subtype; and c) determine the relationship between neglect subtype and functional outcome.

Methodology: Twenty acute stroke patients and twenty matched controls were administered comprehensive neuropsychological assessment batteries, a traditional pencil-and-paper assessment of neglect subtype a novel eye-tracking measure of neglect subtype and a functional outcome measure.

Findings: The eye-tracking measure was more sensitive in identifying neglect subtype in patients than the traditional pencil-and-paper test. The eye-tracking measure also demonstrated adequate specificity, with control participants scoring as normal. Classification of neglect subtype based on eye-tracking performance was a significant predictor of functional outcome above and beyond neuropsychological test performance and traditional tests of neglect. Analysis of early (automatic) vs. late (controlled) eye movement data suggest that early mechanisms of attention remain intact among neglect patients, and that deficits lie in later controlled stages of attention.

Conclusion & Significance: The current results have significant implications for methods of assessing hemispatial neglect to better predict long-term prognosis. Results indicating deficits in controlled mechanisms of attention will be fundamental in directing rehabilitative treatment for individuals suffering from both ego and allocentric neglect.

Break: Networking and Refreshments Break 16:00-16:15 @ Foyer

Simona Trifu

University of Bucharest, Romania

Title: Loneliness and daydreaming, construction of an adolescence

Time : 16:15-16:40

Speaker
Biography:

Simona Trifu is a MD Psychiatrist. She is a Professor in the Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Bucharest; Lecturer at Faculty of Medicine, University of Medicine and Pharmacy "Carol Davila" Bucharest. She has a Doctoral Degree in Psychology and in Medicine. She is a full time Member of International Psychoanalytical Association. She pursued Master’s Degree in Public Health Management. She has published 10 books and is also the author of many articles presented in several international scientific worldwide conferences.

Abstract:

Motivation: The ability of self-organization and decision-making in life provides the control, the self-control and self-confidence. In assuming the tutor role, one must accomplish the maternalization and paternalization functions, but also of ensuring the accomplishment of maternal and paternal roles. To determine the creative abilities or the systematized delirium as a solution for the failure settlement in the adaptation to socio-cultural environment felt traumatic.

Objectives: The objectives of the study were psychological assessment of the current profile and psychical personality structure to understand the functioning patterns and testing the psychic capacity and the limits between reality and imagination, ensuring the success in the labor of therapeutic process, having a starting prognosis.

Hypothesis: In the case of patient T, the difficulties she face can be caused by the depression onset or possibly by the adaptation disorder with anxiety on a pattern of dysfunctional attachment.

Instruments: Anamnesis, clinical interview, drawing the life map, clinical scales were used to assess the patient. The combined application of PANSS scale aims at leading to a better differential diagnosis between the depressive colors versus the onset of a major psychic disorder. The complex investigation of personality also implied the administration of a Lusher projective test, with the tree test, face test, and family test.

Results: The case study highlighted the fissure of the ego that is immature and the existence of mental non-development, to which family, social and environmental factors contributed negatively. In this adolescence period, the patient tries to lean on the defense mechanisms that fail, having a deficient psycho affective structure since primitive childhood.

Conclusions: This case study aims at connecting the heredity data, the structuring in psycho-affective development from the period of primitive evolution phases of early childhood, in psychic health or in the etiology of a possible personality disharmony.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Kay Chang is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at the University of Macau. She actively applies the scientist–practitioner framework in both her academic and clinical work since her graduation from the California School of Professional Psychology, Alameda. She is an US licensed Clinical Psychologist and an UK chartered Clinical Psychologist who has a noticeably diverse experience base by having practiced in US, China, Hong Kong and Macau. She also volunteers for going consultations in abuse cases and disaster trauma work. Her research interests include the applied aspects of Positive Psychology, Medical Anthropology, professional development issues, addictive behaviors, creativity factors and resilient capacities.

Abstract:

Giving birth is an undeniably defining moment of every mother and the postnatal care, in one form or the other, is a crucial adjustment period for women of cross cultures. Yet, the psychosocial factors that add on the demands of new mothers and their self-evaluations are lesser known. This ethnic-specific study investigated the relationships among body image dissatisfaction, postpartum depression, marital satisfaction and objectified body consciousness perceived by women after childbirth within one to six months in Macau. Data from 70 mothers were collected locally from two clinics and one hospital. Results showed a prevalence rate of postpartum depression of 18.6% among these understudied mothers. Both body image dissatisfaction and marital satisfaction were found to contribute to postpartum depression. Body surveillance and body shame were positive predictors of body image dissatisfaction. Furthermore, significant discrepancies in body mass index and body image dissatisfaction suggest a considerable level of body image distortion. Clinical implications of this study for psychiatric and psychological service providers are discussed.

Erez Yaakobi

Ono Academic College, Israel

Title: Recalling an attachment event moderates distress after ostracism

Time : 17:05-17:30

Speaker
Biography:

Erez Yaakobi is an expert in attachment theory, ostracism and terror management theory and conducts research examining their effects on psychological outcomes including health and wellbeing. He has published peer review papers in leading journals and written three books on these topics. He is a Senior Lecturer and teaches psychological research methods and statistical courses at several academic institutions, leads academic programs, and is an Organizational Psychologist serving as a Consultant for organizations in public and private sectors.

Abstract:

Ostracism is known to cause psychological distress. Studies have indicated that immediate distress is resistant to individual differences and situational factors, but delayed reactions are more sensitive to moderation. Because attachment orientation is inextricably tied to rejection and inclusion, we hypothesized that attachment orientation would moderate both immediate and delayed ostracism effects and that recalling an attachment event compatible with a person’s attachment internal working model would moderate the distress of a laboratory ostracism experience. In two experiments, 158 individualistic (secular Jewish) and 190 collectivistic (ultra-Orthodox Jewish) participants played Cyberball with two other ostensible in-group players. Distress was measured immediately after the game and 30 minutes later. The results showed that less anxious and more avoidant individualistic but not collectivistic participants were less distressed by ostracism. After the delay, recall of an attachment event compatible with the participants’ internal working model eliminated distress in both individualistic and collectivistic ostracized participants as measured on the needs satisfaction scale. Among individualistic participants, avoidants, who are known to avoid meaningful attachments, were less distressed by ostracism; anxious participants, who seek proximity, were more distressed. Recalling a compatible attachment event may be a mechanism that reduces individuals’ perceptions of threats to their fundamental needs.

Speaker
Biography:

Hirokazu Osada is a Professor at Department of Psychology, Senshu University, Japan. As a certified Clinical Psychologist, he has a long professional career of conducting early intervention/family intervention for children with neurodevelopmental disorders, especially for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and ADHD. He also applied brief psychotherapy (solution focused brief therapy) especially for adolescents with ASD. As a researcher, he has mainly used an epidemiological method for screening target disorders in general population. Also, he has been using qualitative approach, when he conducts research for generating hypothesis in his target population. His other interest is focused on Trans-cultural Psychiatry.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Callous-Unemotional Traits (CU traits) have been adopted as one of the specified features under Conduct Disorder (CD) in DSM-5. CD is directly related to antisocial behaviors including delinquency. If CU traits could be detected in early life stages, we could prevent children from antisocial behaviors.

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: I conducted national survey for screening CU traits among Japanese children and adolescents by using the Japanese version of the Inventory of Callous Unemotional Traits (JICU). A total of 4088 students (average age was 12.5 years old (SD=1.56), 2125 boys and 1963 girls) participated in this research.

Findings: Cronbach’s alpha calculated by using all the 24 questions was 0.74, which indicated the JICU had acceptable reliability. Average total scores of the JICU was 26.5 (SD=7.91), which was almost the same score reported by Kumsta (2012) among UK sample. I found a certain level of reliability and validity of the JICU. Using 80 percentile score of the JICU as a cut-off for CU traits, 795 students were considered as having CU traits. I found there were no cultural differences between Japanese and American or European children and adolescents, who had presented with CU traits in the previous research.

Conclusion & Significance: We could adopt the previous American and/or European evidence based practices to prevent Japanese children and adolescents with CU traits from antisocial behaviors in the future.

Speaker
Biography:

Victoria Zakopoulou is an Associate Professor at the Department of Speech and Language Therapy of the Technological Educational Institute of Epirus. She holds a PhD in Special Education, and MS and Bachelor’s Degrees in Psychology from the University of Ioannina. Her Postdoctoral Research has been carried out in the University Hospital of Ioannina (Pediatrics Clinic). Her research interests lie in the field of Learning Difficulties, with emphasis in Early Developmental Dyslexia. She is the Head of the Laboratory of New Approaches in Communication Disorders. She is a member of scientific committees and participates actively in the design and realization of scientific, research and corporate projects. She is the author of several research articles and has participated in several National and EU funded research projects.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: The Specific Developmental Dyslexia (SDD) is related to 3-12% of the student population and manifested by a diversity of symptoms in the process of reading and writing acquisition. It is characterized by various interactions of dysfunctions of biological, neurophysiological, cognitive and psychomotor factors. Early detection of SDD at the preschool age is becoming more urgent as it contributes in reducing or preventing multiple negative impacts on later school age. Aiming in this study, to create and implement appropriate individualized early intervention models, early diagnosis procedures were designed, applied, and analyzed through a correlation model of the following factors: cognitive (memory, attention, perception), psychomotor (laterality, spatiotemporal orientation), linguistic (emerging literacy), socio-emotional (internalized and executive behavior).

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: The survey was applied to a sample of 20 infants from 4.6 to 6.0 years, and was completed in the following stages: a) implementation of four preschool diagnostic tools identifying infants at risk for early onset of SDD; b) investigation of main precursors factors; c) figuration of SDD customized profiles; c) design of intervention plans adjusted to the specific needs of each infant, implementing two structured intervention methods.

Findings: Through multivariate analysis models, a total of 12 infants’ diagnostic key SDD profiles were emerged, in a distinct multifaceted complexity. According to the classification and the combined manifest of difficulties, appropriately tailored individual intervention programs were designed and implemented on 10 infants for a period of 8 months.

Conclusion & Significance: Though the current research was attempted to be stressed, the necessity as well as the possibility of developing, at the preschool age: i) safe, individualized diagnostic profiles of SDD and, ii) effective interventions models, well-suited individual specific needs.